Making Training Obsolete


no training

Many organizations have made a conscience decision to remove all forms of employee development from the workplace unless it is a compliance requirement to operate. This means that each and every employee within that company is responsible to figure it out on their own.

The savings that would have been spent to develop people can now be directed toward the recruiting process and the ever revolving door that a company of under skilled employees creates. Arrogant management that finds it digestible to pass on development, and recycle employees is outright disgusting, and yet very few have the backbone to push for change.

There are many organizations that have top rated talent development processes, and I applaud every effort they make to remain vibrant and a true business partner. Yet these same organizations are also staffed with enlightened senior and executive management that fight for their employees and personally are involved in the learning culture. They want both their employees and their company to be successful.

There are even more organizations that have a training function that is so incompetent that they often do more harm than good as they create facades that management are fooled by, because who wants to take the time to evaluate the training function for any kind of return on investment. They make for great window dressing, but very little change to the overall operation. Honestly, the company would do better to close up these ineffective operations if they are unwilling to fix them.

So if your organization has decided to make training obsolete, have you figured out where the money saved is being spent? Does it go to profits that are passed on to shareholders? Does it go toward parties, bonuses, salaries and other perks for the bosses? Maybe it is invested in research & development, or marketing & advertising

A company that operates without regular talent development is also operating with a short term mentality. This means that there are no long term career options, and the company itself is a short term player in the market. Personally I would not work for or invest in any company that has made training obsolete.

Would you?

Do You?

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Does Your CEO Really Value Employee Development?


CFO to CEOToo many training managers tie the value of employee development (AKA) training, to the simple fact that the company pays for it. And while it is obvious that a lack of funding is a sure fire connection to a lack of value, it is but only one indication that this function adds to the organization’s benefit.

In fact, many companies cannot articulate why they have a training function, expect to list what the negative impression it would bring on to the company if they lacked training. “It would be harder to recruit if we didn’t have a training function, and it adds to our efforts for employee retention if we can list training as a perk.”

Yet if you really want to know if your CEO values employee development, I would suggest you look for these signs:

  • There is a training department or at the very least is a job responsibility assigned to a senior manager like the HR Director.
  • The CEO talks with the training manager at least quarterly as to what have been the target development projects and their results. Also the CEO wants an update on future projects coming down the pipeline.
  • The company requires a strategic vision for training, and an annual training project plan.
  • The training function is part of the initial discussions when system changes, new products & services, acquisitions/mergers or policy & procedure changes are coming soon.
  • The CEO and other executive managers regularly discuss why particular training events are needed and how the organization will benefit.
  • A majority of management wants to participate in the learning process themselves, as participants and facilitators.

In organizations that have leadership that understand the value of employee development, it is so much more involved than a cheerleading HR Director and/or Training Manager. It is part of the culture and embraced by a majority of the management team in tangible actions. It really is more important to “walk the talk” but at the very least “talk the talk.”

If your organization does not seem to value training, it is time to schedule a Training Physical and find out what can be done to save the function before it becomes terminal.