Making Training Obsolete


no training

Many organizations have made a conscience decision to remove all forms of employee development from the workplace unless it is a compliance requirement to operate. This means that each and every employee within that company is responsible to figure it out on their own.

The savings that would have been spent to develop people can now be directed toward the recruiting process and the ever revolving door that a company of under skilled employees creates. Arrogant management that finds it digestible to pass on development, and recycle employees is outright disgusting, and yet very few have the backbone to push for change.

There are many organizations that have top rated talent development processes, and I applaud every effort they make to remain vibrant and a true business partner. Yet these same organizations are also staffed with enlightened senior and executive management that fight for their employees and personally are involved in the learning culture. They want both their employees and their company to be successful.

There are even more organizations that have a training function that is so incompetent that they often do more harm than good as they create facades that management are fooled by, because who wants to take the time to evaluate the training function for any kind of return on investment. They make for great window dressing, but very little change to the overall operation. Honestly, the company would do better to close up these ineffective operations if they are unwilling to fix them.

So if your organization has decided to make training obsolete, have you figured out where the money saved is being spent? Does it go to profits that are passed on to shareholders? Does it go toward parties, bonuses, salaries and other perks for the bosses? Maybe it is invested in research & development, or marketing & advertising

A company that operates without regular talent development is also operating with a short term mentality. This means that there are no long term career options, and the company itself is a short term player in the market. Personally I would not work for or invest in any company that has made training obsolete.

Would you?

Do You?

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Even Pointless Training Costs Money!


Pointless Training Cover

I would bet that every single person reading this posting has walked out of a training session, or signed off an online or eLearning event and said something like, “That was pointless.” Either the content was not relevant, or you didn’t connect the reason for the training to your job. In any case, it does not matter if you felt it was pointless, it still cost the company money to provide it.

Both good training and bad training comes with a fee, so if you are going to spend the money on training then demand that it returns on the investment. If a company spends money on training that does not return on an investment, it is like burning cash. But I have an even better idea.

If you have no desire to implement purposeful training that returns appropriate skills and value to the learners and the company, then don’t train. Yes, I said it. Save the money, pay larger salaries, or throw a party. Pointless training is more damaging than no training at all, so if you are going to waste the company budget on pointless training, don’t and defer it to other line items in the budget that will be appreciated.

And while we are on the subject, if your training department cannot seem to implement training that returns on the investment, and aligns with the strategic goals of the company, save even more money and close that department completely. While every company should have a strong learning function, once again, a weak training function does more harm than good. It is time to trim the waste and improve the bottom line by closing training until you find more competent employees to run it.

285671_D1L1_01Six years ago I wrote a book that outlines what it takes to have a healthy and productive training function. It is called “The Training Physical: Diagnose, Treat and Cure Your Training Department.” The idea was through a self-audit process or better yet by hiring a 3rd party that is objective, you could identify what is working and fix what is not working.

Pointless Training CoverLast year I wrote the sequel, “Pointless Training: The Consequences of Inadequate Training Strategies to emphasize by content areas how easy training could become pointless to employees and the company, and with a bit more effort how it could become purposeful instead.

I wrote these books to help organizations provide good learning environments and solid learning events for their employees. Each book is less than $15 from the publisher, and provides the necessary information for training departments to be genuine business partners. Some companies have invested $30 to become healthier, and some have chosen to remain ineffective while wasting thousands of dollars a year. Honestly, does that make any sense?

For more information go to www.TheTrainingPhysical.com

Zero Skill Deficiencies?


no trainingI discovered another company this week that does not see the need to train staff.  There is no training department, and Human Resources have been told by the CEO that there is no need to focus on training.  As it turns out, the CEO and I are connected in LinkedIn, so I sent her an email and asked:

What are your employee skill deficiencies?

Much to my surprise she responded with an honest answer, that she didn’t know off-hand, and wanted to know the purpose of my question.

So I continued the email conversation with an appreciation for her honesty, and that I had heard that training was not on the agenda anymore.  In my mind this means there are zero skill deficiencies, and I was excited to hear how this company had pulled this off.  In 25 plus years I had not found a single company that had perfectly aligned skill sets and was eager to learn how their process could be duplicated.

Well, as you can imagine, there was a pause.  In fact for over a week, and just when I was about to follow-up, she replied and told me that in fact there were quite a few skill deficiencies, many common ones, and that it may be the reason certain projects and objectives may not be getting accomplished.  Dumbstruck once again with her honesty, I asked her if she wants to change this situation.  I’m currently waiting on her response.

You see, not training employees was going to be the way forward, until someone bothered to question that decision.  Yes, HR should have done it, but she was uncomfortable doing it so I did it for her.  If we are going to serve the companies we work for than we need to do our jobs well.  And at times that means questioning a decision, process or in this case a missing component for employees to perform well.

I will admit that this CEO is an open-minded leader, and you may not be working with that kind of mindset currently.  If you need help communicating your concerns to senior management, let’s brain-storm on the phone and come up with a strategy.  It may or may not work, but never walk away from a bad processes because you fear trying.

Why Don’t You Train Your Employees?


thumbnailCA4Z1XR6Most management retention surveys will tell you that employee development ranks very high on the reason your employees stay with you year to year, and that compensation is actually near the bottom of the list.  While every company pays their employees to work, not every company provides training development.

Why Don’t You Train Your Employees?

I made a friend this past week by asking this question.  Not really a friend at first since he was beyond ticked off that I had the audacity to ask the question, but eventually he warmed up to understanding the value he was missing by not providing his employees with professional development.  Let’s say we parted as friends.

You see this company has a great reputation, and very good employee reviews on sites like Glassdoor.com, and if they were only looking at training as a retention tool, I can see why it was never prioritized very high.  Yet, when I discovered that most of their recruiting efforts required HR to go outside the company, I realized it was because they were not building competencies in-house.

There was also zero succession plans on the books for any position in this company of 150+ employees and they continued plans to grow would be hampered if they continually need to source external applicants.

You may wonder why your company trains management and leadership competencies.  If subject matter experts are trained in management communications they can assume supervisory and manager roles in their units.  If you don’t train these skills then you are hard pressed to promote people.  You have to go outside.

Yet the same goes for skills to perform another person’s job.  If you can train an existing employee to do another job, you retain an employee that already knows your culture and how to get things done.  They “hit the ground running” better than an external hire.

If you currently don’t train your employees beyond the required compliance topics for your industry, then let’s talk for 30 minutes.  The call is free, and I guarantee there are benefits to training that you are not using to your advantage.  Email me at jim@jkhopkinsconsulting.com to set up a time to talk.

 

 

 

 

When Training Comes Too Late


Good training prepares an employee with the skills necessary to do the job at hand.  Along with work experience, well-trained employees can tackle future responsibilities when the need arises.  But what happens if training comes too late in an employee’s journey?  What happens when a company decides “we are doing just fine right now, and we will start training later?”

10 years ago the mortgage industry was a very large employer.  Most banks had large staffs of employees concentrating on home mortgage loans, and there were dozens of large mortgage companies across the country employing thousands of people.  Each of these companies had robust training and learning environments to keep growing their employee populations.  When the housing bubble burst, there where a lot of highly skilled, but unemployed people without work.

Yet over the past couple of years, the mortgage industry is coming back online.  It would seem at first glance all these companies would have to do is rehire from the past and training wouldn’t be necessary.  Yet new laws, compliance changes, and different products are now part of the new mortgage industry.  Likewise, all of those former employees needed to find work and a majority of them found new careers.

So you might imagine that restarting the mortgage industry would be a little like starting from scratch, and with that in mind, include training in the foundation of the company.  Most though are trying to make it without expending money and attention to employee development.  They are waiting.  Waiting for the need to become so obvious that it may be too late to make a difference by that point in time.

Training is not magic.  Rather it is more of a science when it comes to adult learning.  Not only do adults prefer to learn as they see a need, they also want to apply what they learned rather soon after acquiring the skill.  This means that the training function cannot arrive the same day that we want to train a skill.  There is a lot of upfront work to make sure a training initiative is implemented correctly to achieve the desired results.

Now while I chose the mortgage industry as my example in this blog, they are by far not the only industry waiting and postponing the implementation of training.  Some companies wait too long, and fail before they can adjust to change.  If your company employs people, then you should have a training function.  Unless of course your goal is to go out of business someday. And without training, it is just a matter of time before you do.

Is It Time For A Chief Talent Officer?


One of the most frustrating parts of running a learning function can be when the focus is always on entry-level skills for new employees.  While this is perfectly acceptable if your organization is growing, it is not a good sign if you are always training replacement players.

I’ve been reading a lot lately about the Chief Talent Officer role, and how Talent Acquisition and Talent Retention are blended with Talent Development.  The more I understand how these functions are separated from other HR functions like payroll, benefits, employee relations, performance management and compliance I see the value of the split focus between two dedicated leaders within the company.

Not every company has the two functions, so what happens is that the head of HR must try to focus on all of these areas at the same time, and that rarely happens.  If, and I say a very big if, each function as a very competent manager that works well with the other HR managers, there is essentially a working model without the fancy titles.  Yet most of the time, HR spends its time on the urgent areas mentioned above that do not fall into the talent model.

So learning is substandard, recruiting is a revolving door because retention is never a focus.  Maybe it is time for a better way to manage the people side of the business.  Maybe it is time for the Chief Talent Officer role.

What are your thoughts?